Inspection program finds good compliance on training and licensing

Information status

All announcements issued prior to 1 July 2017 were issued by the former Department of Commerce. Announcements listed here are the latest versions available, but may be subject to review. For more information on this announcement, please contact online@dmirs.wa.gov.au.

This announcement is for: 
Employee / workerEmployer

A proactive inspection program looking at construction sites in Perth’s northern suburbs has found a high level of compliance in training and licensing, but has raised some concerns in other areas.

The program involved construction inspectors checking safety standards at construction sites across the northern suburbs from Joondalup to Yanchep in the final week of August.

Inspectors focussed on the priority areas of electrical safety and working at heights, and also checked whether workers had the appropriate induction training and held High Risk Work licences where required.

They also looked at edge protection and scaffolding and Safe Work Method Statements.

WorkSafe Director Chris Kirwin said today the program had revealed good compliance with training and licensing, but some concern with other issues.

“A total of 44 construction sites were visited as part of the program, with 29 improvement notices and five prohibition notices issued at the sites,” Mr Kirwin said.

“Almost half of the improvement notices issued related to electrical problems (13 notices), with another ten notices relating to scaffolding issues.

"However it was encouraging to find that all construction workers checked during the program held blue or white cards, and all workers carrying out high risk work held the relevant High Risk Work Licences.

“In addition, OSH Management Plans and Safe Work Method Statements were available when required, and only one notice was issued in relation to Safe Work Method Statements.

“It seems the construction industry has got the message with regard to training and licensing and planning for safe work practices on construction sites.

“But the number of notices issued relating to electricity did raise some concerns, as did the number of notices issued related to scaffolding.

“The consequences of using unsafe electrical equipment can be disastrous, but it’s relatively easy to ensure that all portable electrical items are tested and tagged and that all leads and so on are in a safe condition.

“Having safe scaffolding is also a must, with the consequences of a fall from height also potentially extremely serious.

“So with the exception of a couple of areas of concern, we’re happy with the results of the inspection program and plan to continue to conduct this type of program to ensure the construction industry maintains its standards.”

Further information 

Media contact: Caroline De Vaney 6251 2363 or 0408 927563 (media enquiries only)

caroline.devaney@commerce.wa.gov.au

Follow @WorkSafeWA on Twitter

WorkSafe
Media release
18 Sep 2015

Share this page:

Last modified: