Requirements for a Park Liaison Committee - Residential parks bulletin issue 11

8 October 2019

Requirements for a Park Liaison Committee

The Residential Parks (Long stay Tenants) Act 2006 (Parks Act) provides that park operators have a responsibility to take all reasonable steps to convene and maintain a Park Liaison Committee (PLC) if a park has 20 or more long-stay sites. Parks with fewer long-stay sites may establish a PLC if they choose.

The PLC is an advisory and consultative body with the aim of assisting the park operator to improve the lifestyle and wellbeing of park tenants.

Under section 59(1) of the Parks Act it is an offence if a park operator does not take all reasonable steps to convene and maintain a PLC (maximum penalty of $5,000).

The Commissioner’s guidelines provide further detail on the establishment and operation of park liaison committees.

What are the considerations for membership of the PLC?

The Parks Act requires that a PLC consists of:

  • one or more park tenants, chosen by other park tenants to represent their interests; and
  • one or more representatives of the park operator.

A PLC must include more tenant representatives than representatives of the park operator. The Commissioner’s guidelines provide further information on the process for election of tenant representatives on a PLC.

How can the PLC help?

The PLC is to advise and consult with the park operator regarding:

  • preparing and amending park rules;
  • developing guidelines for the standards of behaviour of park tenants;
  • developing policies for the improvement and maintenance of the natural environment and amenities of the park; and
  • developing policies for the installation and maintenance of roads, street and other security lighting and fencing within the park.

The PLC also has a role in assisting the park operator to resolve disputes between park tenants or between the park operator and a tenant. A PLC may wish to establish a dispute resolution process in relation to this role. The Commissioner’s guidelines provide further guidance on what should be included in a dispute resolution process.

It is important to note that the PLC plays an advisory role only, responsibility for final decisions in relation to management of the park remain with the park operator.

If there is no PLC, the park rules or the agreement may set out an alternative dispute resolution process. 

I need help, things have gone wrong

If a problem arises between tenants and park operators, disputes should be resolved by discussing the issues and trying to come to a resolution that suits both parties. Its recommended park operators and long-stay tenants become familiar with the guidelines

Consumer Protection provides general advice for both park operators and tenants. Consumer Protection may be able to conciliate some complaints, however if a dispute cannot be resolved either a tenant or a park operator may apply to the State Administrative Tribunal (SAT) for a determination.
 
Enquires can be made to Consumer Protection by email or by calling 1300 304 054.

Consumer Protection
Bulletin
Last updated 09 Oct 2019

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