WorkSafe operational priority statistics summary

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WorkSafe Operations Directorate routinely identifies a number of priority areas across industries, which are targeted for enforcement and compliance activities in order to reduce the occurrence of work-related injuries and promote safe work practices. The high-risk nature of the work in these areas means that they are likely to have a higher incidence of work-related injury and disease. 

Priority areas address particular occupational health and safety issues. Selection takes into account workers compensation claim figures, work-related fatality data collected by WorkSafe. Claim figures may also support the assessment of the effectiveness of efforts made in a particular area. 

It is important to understand that there are limitations associated with use of claim data; however the inability to justify or verify priority area selection using claim-based statistics should not exclude the choice of an area.  Although there are some exclusions from claim-based data, such as cases for self-employed people, overall it provides the best indicators of OSH status available.

Claim data for lost time injuries and diseases (LTI/Ds) assist decision making when determining an overall approach.  This approach may incorporate one or more of the following goals from a statistical point of view:

  • reduction in numbers of LTI/Ds and fatalities
  • reduction in incidence rates
  • reduction in frequency rates
  • reduction in duration and severity (frequency of long duration LTI/Ds)
  • reduction in worker's compensation premiums

These areas are currently:

  • electricity;
  • fall from heights;
  • slips and trips;
  • body stressing (or manual tasks);
  • mobile plant and vehicle movement;
  • machine guarding; and
  • hazardous substances.

The following sections provide a brief overview of statistics and general information for each priority. LTI/Ds refer to lost time injuries and diseases where one or more days/shifts have been lost from work as a result of a workplace incident, unless otherwise stated.
“p” refers to preliminary data.

Electricity

  • According to work-related traumatic injury fatality data, electrocution has claimed the lives of three workers in the five years from 2011-12 to 2015-16 – an Electrical or Telecommunications Trades Assistant in 2012-13, an Electrical Linesworker in 2013-14, and an Electrician (General) in 2015-16. The industry of workplace for all three deaths was the Construction division.
  • A total of 198 LTI/Ds were recorded against the mechanism of incident classification Contact with electricity during the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p, with 42 LTI/Ds in 2011-12, 40 in 2012-13, 41 in 2013-14, 45 in
  • 2014-15, and 30 in 2015-16p.
  • Of the 42 LTI/Ds recorded during 2011-12, 2 053 days were lost from work at an estimated cost of $932 894. Preliminary data for 2015-16 indicate a marked rise to 3 109 days lost and an estimated cost of $2 189 258 despite recording a lower number of LTI/Ds (30). This equates to an average duration of around 104 days lost at an estimated cost of $72 975 per LTI/D in 2015-16p. In the five-year period to 2015-16p, 2012-13 recorded the highest number of days lost at 4 159; 2013-14 recorded the highest total estimated cost at $3 702 706.
  • Of the 30 LTI/Ds recorded during 2015-16p, over 90 per cent related to the nature of injury classification Electrocution, shock from electric current, the remainder was for Electrical burn. 47 per cent of LTI/Ds were classed as serious incidences (LTI/Ds where five days/shifts or more are lost from work) and 20 per cent were classed as severe incidences (LTI/Ds where 60 days/shifts or more are lost from work).
  • On average (2011-12 to 2015-16p), seven severe cases (60 days/shifts lost or more) per year are associated with the mechanism of incident classification Contact with electricity.
  • The breakdown agencies of Distribution lines: low tension and Control apparatus were collectively responsible for half of Electrocution, shock from electric current injuries (51 per cent or 89 LTI/Ds) and almost two-thirds of Electrical burn injuries (63 per cent or 15 LTI/Ds) associated with the mechanism of incident Contact with electricity over the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p.
  • It is presumed that many electric shocks are not reported, some of which could be potentially fatal.
  • Predictably, the occupation subgroup Electrotechnology and Telecommunications Trades Workers incurred the most electricity related injuries during 2011-12 to 2015-16p (37 LTI/Ds). Other occupation subgroups to record at least 10 LTI/Ds over the five-year period due to contact with electricity include Automotive and Engineering Trades Workers (23 LTI/Ds), Other Labourers (12 LTI/Ds), and Cleaning and Laundry Workers recording 10 LTI/Ds.
  • Construction Services, Food & Beverage Services, Machinery and Equipment Manufacturing, Preschool and School Education, and Hospitals are the industry subdivisions to record the highest number of such LTI/Ds during the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p (in order of magnitude).

Fall from heights

  • Eight work-related traumatic injury fatalities were recorded during the five years from 2011-12 to 2015-16 in relation to falls from a height (one in 2012-13, two in 2013-14, one in 2014-15, and four in 2015-16). One of the deaths in 2013-14 was a retiree and the worker who died in 2012-13 was aged between 20-24 years old.
  • Three work-related traumatic injury fatalities were recorded in the Manufacturing division and three in the Arts and Recreation Services division. The remaining two fatalities were recorded in the Transport, Postal and Warehousing division and the Electricity, Gas, Water & Waste Services division.
  • Preliminary data shows there were 1 095 LTI/Ds recorded during 2015-16p for the mechanism of incident classification Falls from a height – a decrease of 19.4 per cent compared to 2011-12. LTI/Ds have consistently decreased since 2011-12 when 1 354 LTI/Ds were recorded.
  • The proportion of serious incidences (LTI/Ds where five days/shifts or more are lost from work) increased from 81 per cent in 2011-12 to 86 per cent in 2015-16p.
  • In respect to the proportion of severe cases (60 days/shifts lost or more) to total LTI/Ds, incidences have increased from 33 per cent (2011-12 and 2012-13), to 36 per cent (2013-14 and 2014-15), to 41 per cent in 2015-16p. In terms of actual numbers, severe LTI/Ds increased by five cases during 2015-16p compared to 2011-12 (from 443 to 448).
  • During 2011-12 a total of 121 459 days were lost from work due to falls from heights at an estimated cost of $71 732 509. Figures have fallen to 117 608 days lost from work at an estimated cost of $63 865 610 in 2015-16p – this equates to around 107 days lost per LTI/D at an estimated cost of $58 325. However, the average duration and cost per LTI/D in 2015-16p is higher than that recorded in 2011-12 when the average duration and cost per LTI/D was 90 days and $52 978.
  • The breakdown agencies involved in most fall from height injuries during the five-year period were, in order of magnitude, Ladders with 1 073 LTI/Ds (down 3.1 per cent from 224 LTI/Ds in 2011-12 to 217 2015-16p), Trucks, semi-trailers, lorries with 994 LTI/Ds (down 19.7 per cent from 213 to 171) and Steps and stairways with 982 LTI/Ds (down 15.5 per cent from 220 to 186).
  • In relation to ladders, the occupations experiencing the most falls from ladders during the five-year period were Electricians (General), Sales Assistants (General), Plumbers (General), Carpenters, and Painting Trades Workers.
  • The Construction Services subdivision recorded the highest number of Fall from height LTI/Ds during 2015-16p at 189 incidences accounting for 17.3 per cent of total LTI/Ds in this year – a fall of 15.6 per cent in LTI/Ds compared to 2011-12. Road Transport recorded the second highest with 82 LTI/Ds in 2015-16p, a fall of 13.7 per cent compared to 2011-12; followed by Preschool & School Education at 79 LTI/Ds (up 17.9 per cent); and Heavy & Civil Engineering Construction at 48 LTI/Ds (down 5.9 per cent).
  • In order of magnitude the most common types of injury resulting from Falls from a height during 2015-16p are Soft tissue injuries due to trauma or unknown mechanism (accounts for 37.8 per cent of falls from height LTI/Ds), LTI/Ds decreased 23.9 per cent compared to 2011-12; and Other fractures, not elsewhere classified accounting for 22.5 per cent (LTI/Ds decreased 17.7 per cent compared to 2011-12).
  • Knees, ankles, shoulders and lower back continue to be the areas of the body most affected by Falls from a height LTI/Ds.

Slips and trips (falls on the same level)

  • During the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p, one work-related traumatic injury fatality was recorded in 2014-15 in the subdivision of Road Transport.
  • 2 902 LTI/Ds were recorded against the mechanism of incident classification Falls on the same level during 2015-16p – an increase of 0.6 per cent compared to 2011-12. An average of 2 886 LTI/Ds were recorded each year during 2011-12 and 2015-16p.
  • A total number of 248 258 days were lost during 2015-16p at an estimated cost of
  • $138 949 830 which equates to around 86 days lost per LTI/D at an estimated cost of $47 881. Compared to 2011-12, these figures have risen by seven days lost and by an extra $6 383 per LTI/D.
  • Serious incidences (LTI/Ds where five days/shifts or more are lost from work) have increased 9.7 per cent during 2015-16p compared to 2011-12. Proportionally, serious cases have grown around seven percentage points, from 76 to 83 per cent.
  • The proportion of severe cases (60 days/shifts lost or more) has increased over the five-year period from 28 per cent in 2011-12 to 37 per cent in 2015-16p.
  • During 2015-16p, the nature of injury classification resulting in the most injuries from Falls on the same level was Soft tissue injuries due to trauma or unknown mechanisms and accounted for 40.9 per cent all Falls on the same level LTI/Ds. Nine more LTI/Ds of such incidences were recorded in 2015-16p than in 2011-12 (from 1 179 to 1 188).
  • Breakdown agency of injury classifications involved in most soft tissue injuries from Falls on the same level in 2015-16p are Traffic & ground surfaces other (accounting for 25.5 per cent), Other internal traffic & ground surfaces (15 per cent), Wet, oily, or icy internal traffic & ground surfaces (13.4 per cent), and Internal traffic & ground areas with hazardous substances (11.9 per cent).
  • Industry subdivisions that recorded the most LTI/Ds during 2015-16p were Preschool & School Education with 345 LTI/Ds (up 10.9 per cent compared to 2011-12), Construction Services with 251 (up 19 per cent), and Hospitals with 162 (a reduction of two LTI/D's in 2011-12).
  • Occupation classifications most commonly associated with Falls on the same level during 2014-15p were Truck Driver (General) and Sales Assistant (General) each recording 1152 LTI/Ds, Aged or Disabled Carer (100), Teacher’s Aide (88), and Commercial Cleaner (75 LTI/Ds).
  • Knees, ankles, and lower back are the parts of the body most affected by these types of injury.
  • Over the five-year period it was the 65-100 year old age group who suffered the greatest increase in Falls on the same level LTI/Ds over the five-year period (up 54.9 per cent from 82 in 2011-12 to 127 in 2015-16p). This age group was followed by the 60-64 age group (up 34.4 per cent from 209 LTI/Ds to 281) and the 25-34 age group (up 17.5 per cent from 462 to 543).
  • The age group responsible for greatest proportion of LTI/Ds for the mechanism Falls on the same level during 2015-16p is the 45-54 age group (26 per cent or 749 LTI/Ds). Over the five-year reporting period this age group accounted for 27 per cent (or 3 936 LTI/Ds) of injuries from Falls on the same level.

Body Stressing (or manual tasks)

  • Body stressing remains the most common cause of injury in Australia.
  • Body stressing injuries accounted for more than a third (37.6 per cent) of all LTI/Ds in Western Australia during 2015-16p (6 357 LTI/Ds). LTI/Ds decreased 13.3 per cent compared to 2011-12.
  • There have been no fatalities directly attributable to body stressing.
  • During 2015-16p, the frequency of body stressing injuries in WA was 3.00 LTI/Ds per one million hours worked, a rise from 2.91 in 2014-15 and a fall from 3.61 in 2011-12.
  • Based on 2015-16 preliminary figures, around 93 days were lost from work per body stressing injury at an estimated cost of $50 742 per LTI/D. On average, body stressing LTI/Ds in Western Australia are estimated to cost $351 008 867 per year.
  • During 2015-16p, 39 per cent of Body stressing LTI/Ds (or 2 500) resulted in 60 days/shifts or more lost from work – a rise from 30 per cent in 2011-12.
  • There are four classifications that make up the Body stressing group. Muscular stress while handling objects other than lifting, carrying or putting down and Muscular stress while lifting, carrying or putting down objects are the two highest recording mechanisms of incident in the group and on average account for 52% and 35% of the group respectively.
  • Muscular stress while handling objects other than lifting, carrying or putting down LTI/Ds decreased 11.8 per cent during 2015-16p compared to 2011-12 (from 3 836 to 3 382 incidences) while Muscular stress while lifting, carrying or putting down objects LTI/Ds fell 13.8 per cent (from 2 517 in 2011-12 to 2 169 in 2015-16p).
  • Agency not apparent is the highest recording breakdown agency of body stressing injuries. Other common identifiable causes are Crates, cartons, boxes, cases, drums, kegs, barrels, Other person and Ferrous and non-ferrous metal. Incidences decreased by 21.4, 27.9, 2.6, and 10.7 per cent respectively.
  • As you would probably expect the classifications of Lower back, Shoulder, Knee and Back unspecified are the areas of the body most affected by these types of injuries.
  • As in previous years, the 45-54 age group recorded the highest number of body stressing LTI/Ds during 2015-16p at 1 775 – a decrease of 8.2 per cent compared to 2011-12. The lowest numbers recorded in this year were attributed to the oldest and youngest age groups: 65-100 and 15-19 age groups (151 and 146 LTI/Ds respectively). Body stressing LTI/Ds increased across the three oldest age groups over the five-year period: the 55-59,
  • 60-64, and 65-100 age groups recorded respective increases of 2.5, 1.1, and 34.8 per cent. All other age groups recorded reductions.
  • During 2015-16p, the Construction Services (559 LTI/Ds), Hospitals (544), and Preschool and School Education (306) subdivisions accounted for the largest proportion of body stressing injuries. All recorded reductions over the five-year period (2011-12 to 2015-16p) of 2.1, 8.4, and 5.3 per cent respectively.
  • Occupation classifications experiencing the most body stressing injuries during 2015-16p (in order of magnitude) were Storeperson a fall of 25.7 per cent (from 366 in 2011-12 to 272 in 2015-16p), Sales Assistant (General) a rise of 27.6 per cent (from 210 to 268), Truck Driver (General) down 24.5 per cent (from 339 to 256), Aged or Disabled Carer down 29.7 per cent (from 337 to  237 LTI/Ds), and Fitter (General), up one LTI/D from 175 to 176.

Mobile plant and vehicle movement

  • Examples of mobile plant include forklifts, ride-on mowers, cement mixers, harvesters, road rollers, tractors, and earthmoving and fairground equipment.
  • 14 work-related traumatic injury fatalities were known to be associated with mobile plant during the period 2011-12 to 2015-16 (2.8 deaths per year on average). The highest recording year in the five-year period was 2012-13 with four fatalities. Three work-related traumatic injury fatalities involving mobile plant were notified to WorkSafe during 2015-16.
  • Six of these deaths were associated with Being hit by moving objects (three in 2011-12, one in 2012-13, one in 2014-15, and one in 2015-16). Multiple incidents involved Front-end loaders, log handling plant, other loading plant (three deaths) and Graders, dozers, snowploughs, other scraping plant (two deaths). One death involved the classification of Tractors, agricultural or otherwise.
  • Five deaths were recorded in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing division, three in Construction, and three in the Mining division. The remaining three deaths were recorded in the Transport, Postal and Warehousing division, the Manufacturing division, and Public Administration & Safety division.
  • A further six work-related traumatic injury fatalities were associated with the mechanism classification Being hit by moving objects involving transport vehicles and the safe movement of such. Four involved Trucks, semi-trailers, lorries, one involved Motorised craft, and the sixth involved the classification of Cars, station wagons, vans, utilities. The fatalities were recorded in the following years: one in 2011-12, one in 2012-13, two in 2013-14, one in 2014-15, and one in 2015-16 who was a bystander.
  • According to preliminary data, 729 mobile plant related LTI/Ds were recorded during 2015-16. The number of WA LTI/Ds involving mobile plant fell 24.5 per cent compared to 2011-12.
  • Of the mobile plant incidences reported during 2015-16p, over a third (36 per cent) resulted in 60 days or more lost from work compared to 33 per cent of LTI/Ds in 2011-12.
  • A total of 63 637 days were lost from work-related mobile plant incidences during
  • 2015-16p which equates to around 87 days lost per LTI/D. Each LTI/D cost an estimated $52 731 – a 17.4 per cent decrease compared to the cost per LTI/D in 2011-12 ($63 873).
  • Of the 729 LTI/Ds recorded in the mobile plant category during 2015-16p, the greatest proportion was attributable to Trolleys, handcarts with 24.3 per cent (or 177 LTI/Ds) followed by Front-end loaders, log handling plant, other loading plant with 12.6 per cent (or 92), and Trailers, caravans with 11 per cent (or 80 LTI/Ds). Incidences in these categories decreased 23, 33.3, and 23.8 per cent respectively compared to 2011-12.
  • The largest increase of mobile plant LTI/Ds over the five-year period was for the classification pneumatic tools (up 34.8 per cent from 23 LTI/Ds in 2011-12 to 31 in 2015-16p).
  • 41 per cent of cases during 2015-16p are associated with the mechanism Muscular stress while handling objects other than lifting, carrying or putting down objects. Other common mechanisms of incident are Being hit by moving objects (13 per cent), Falls from a height (12 per cent), and Hitting stationary objects (seven per cent).
  • With the exception of Rollover and Contact with electricity which recorded less than five LTI/Ds in each comparative year, the largest increase of all mechanism classifications in relation to mobile plant LTI/Ds occurred under the category Exposure to mechanical vibration. Incidences increased 44.4 per cent, from nine in 2011-12 to 13 in 2015-16p (20 LTI/Ds were recorded in 2012-13). Notable decreases over the same period include Being hit by falling objects, down 58.3 per cent (from 36 to 15 LTI/Ds), Being trapped between stationary and moving objects, down 56.3 per cent (from 48 to 21), and Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment, down 43.9 per cent (from 41 to 23).
  • The lower back, shoulder, knee and fingers are the most prevalent areas of the body affected by injuries involving mobile plant. In 2015-16p, the ranking order of these classifications changed to (in order or magnitude) Lower back (123 LTI/Ds), Knee (83), Shoulder (80) and Fingers (68).
  • The age group to experience the only increase in mobile plant LTI/Ds during 2015-16p compared to 2011-12 was the 65-100 age group at 26.7 per cent (from 15 to 19 LTI/Ds). The 15-19 year old age group experienced the greatest reduction in LT I/Ds over the same period at 47.1 per cent (from 34 LTI/Ds to 18).
  • During the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p the 45-54 year old age group accounted for the greatest proportion of mobile plant LTI/Ds (25 per cent) followed by the 35-44 year old age group (24 per cent). Incidences fell 20.4 and 33.7 per cent respectively over the same period.
  • Construction Services (93 LTI/Ds), Metal Ore Mining (81 LT I/Ds), Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction (56), Agriculture (45) and Exploration and Other Mining Support Services (42) were the highest recording industry subdivisions of work-related mobile plant LTI/Ds during 2015-16p.
  • The most susceptible occupations to this type of injury (in order of magnitude) during the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p were Miner, Truck Driver (General), Fitter (General), Mobile Plant Operators nec, and Loader Operator.  
  • In respect to the safe movement of vehicles, the mechanism of incident classification of Being hit by moving objects, which among other things includes being hit by moving vehicles or moving parts of operated equipment, recorded a 27.1 per cent reduction in LTI/Ds during 2015-16p compared to 2011-12 (from 133 to 97). The number of LTI/Ds did however rise when compared to 2014-15 the previous year (from 82 to 97 LTI/Ds).
  • The proportion of severe cases (LTI/Ds 60+ days/shifts lost from work) of Being hit by moving objects involving mobile plant and the safe movement of vehicles also reduced over the same five-year period, from 29 to 24 per cent. The highest proportion of severe LTI/Ds was recorded in 2014-15 (35 per cent).
  • The most common natures of injury associated with Being hit by moving objects involving mobile plant and the safe movement of vehicles over the five-year reporting period were Contusion, bruising and superficial crushing, Other fractures, not elsewhere classified, and Laceration or open wound not involving traumatic amputation accounting for 29, 23, and 17 per cent of LTI/Ds respectively.

Machine guarding

  • There is no classification code to specifically define incidences resulting from a lack of “machine guarding”. The mechanism of incident Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment has been used as an indication of these types of incident. Other injuries may also have occurred in relation to machine guarding other than “being trapped”; however it is not possible to definitively identify such incidences via the coding framework.
  • There have been 10 work-related traumatic injury fatalities resulting from Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment during the period from 2011-12 to 2015-16 (three in 2012-13, two in 2013-14, one in 2014-15, and four in 215-16). It is not always possible to categorically say all deaths relating to this mechanism were due to a lack of guarding on the machines involved.
  • The occupations of the 10 workers were varied as was the type of plant, machinery or equipment involved. These included but not limited to Forklift trucks (two deaths), Ore and stone crushers, Power hoists, Agricultural conveyors, Integrated mining plant, and Mobile platform and stairways.
  • Four of the deaths were recorded in the Mining industry division, three in Manufacturing and three in Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing.
  • 196 LTI/Ds were recorded for the mechanism of incident Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment during 2015-16p – the lowest annual figure in the five-year period (2011-12 to 2015-16p). Injuries in relation to this mechanism have fallen 25.2 per cent compared to 2011-12.
  • The proportion of severe incidences (60 days/shifts lost or more) increased over the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p; from 15 per cent in 2011-12 to 30 per cent in 2015-16p.
  • The most common natures of injury during 2015-16p associated with this mechanism of incident were Other fractures, not elsewhere classified (66 LTI/Ds) and Laceration or open wound not involving traumatic amputation (48 LTI/Ds) accounting for 33.7 and 24.5 per cent of LTI/Ds respectively.
  • The nature of injury classification Traumatic amputation accounted for 11.2 per cent of 2015-16p work-related LTI/Ds. Incidences increased 15.8 per cent compared to 2011-12 (from 19 LTI/Ds to 22).
  • The vast majority of amputations relating to the mechanism Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment continues to be Fingers and Thumb. In
  • 2015-16p, 20 out of 22 Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment lost time injuries were associated with either the bodily location of Fingers or Thumb.
  • The most common breakdown agency classifications involved with Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment incidences during 2015-16p were Doors and windows (15 LTI/Ds), Other and not specified production line type of plant or stand-alone machinery (14), Power presses (13), Trucks, semi-trailers, lorries (12), and Conveyor belts and escalators (11).
  • Fitter (General), Truck Driver (General), Metal Fabricator, and Metal Engineering Process Worker were the occupations (in order of magnitude) most susceptible to this type of injury during the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p.
  • In 2015-16, the latest preliminary data year, the occupations of Fitter (General) and Metal Engineering Process Worker experienced the most LTI/Ds for Being trapped by moving machinery or equipment (12 and seven LTI/Ds respectively).
  • The highest recording subdivisions in 2015-16p regarding these types of work-related injuries are Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing (16 LTI/Ds), Construction Services (14), Food Product Manufacturing and Agriculture each recorded 13 LTI/Ds, and Exploration and Other Mining Support Services (10). 

Hazardous substances

  • Preliminary data show that 258 LTI/Ds were recorded during 2015-16p for the mechanism of incident group Chemical and Other Substances – the second lowest level (behind 2014-15 with 253) in the five-year reporting period and a 21.1 per cent decrease compared to 2011-12.
  • The proportion of serious incidences (LTI/Ds where five or more days are lost from work) had increased from 41 per cent of total LTI/Ds in 2011-12 to 54 per cent in 2014-15 before falling to 51 per cent in 2015-16p.
  • The proportion of severe incidences (which resulted in 60 days/shifts or more lost from work) has increased considerably over the five-year period from four per cent of total LTI/Ds in 2011-12 to 10 per cent in 214-15. Severe LTI/Ds currently account for nine per cent of total LTI/Ds in 2015-16p.
  • The total number of days lost in 2011-12 from such incidences was 4 949, increasing 39.7 per cent to 6 915 during 2015-16p. This equates to about 27 days lost from work per LTI/D in 2015-16p at an estimated cost of $14 079 per LTI/D.
  • Drilling down into this mechanism group, the greatest proportion of LTI/Ds is attributable to the subgroup Single contact with chemical of substance followed by Insect and spider bites and stings. During 2015-16p, these subgroups accounted for 69 per cent (or 177 LTI/Ds) and 29 per cent (or 75 LTI/Ds) respectively.
  • Poisoning and toxic effects of substances, Chemical burn, and Contact dermatitis are the most prevalent natures of injury associated with this mechanism group and are typical outcomes of contact with chemicals. All three classifications recorded reductions by a respective 24.1, 6.7, and 41.4 per cent during 2015-16p comparative to 2011-12.
  • The Eyeball, Hand and Respiratory system in general continue to be the parts of the body most affected by hazardous substances (in order of magnitude). These rankings change slightly in 2015-16 preliminary data with Respiratory system in general taking top spot, Eyeball, and Eye unspecified sharing third place with Hand. LTI/D's for the subgroup of Respiratory system in general increased 34.4 per cent during 2015-16p compared to 2011-12 (from 32 to 43 LTI/Ds).
  • Other chemical products (such as dyes), Insects, Spiders and other arachnids, and Industrial gases, fumes continue to be the most common breakdown agencies (in order of prevalence) of lost time injuries or diseases relating to the Chemical and Other Substances mechanism group during the five-year period from 2011-12 to 2015-16p.
  • The breakdown agency of injury of Industrial gases, fumes was associated with the most LTI/Ds regarding chemicals and other substances in 2015-16p. LTI/Ds fell by three during the five-year reporting period (from 40 to 37 LTI/Ds).
  • Occupations to record the highest number of LTI/Ds during 2015-16p were Prison Officers with 13 LTI/Ds, Labourers nec (10 LTI/Ds), and Electrician (General) and Cleaners nec each recording nine LTI/Ds.
  • During 2015-16p, the subdivisions to record the highest numbers of LTI/Ds relating to Chemicals and other substances were Public Order, Safety and Regulatory Services with 26 LTI/Ds followed by Construction Services and Heavy & Civil Engineering Construction (each recording 19 LTI/Ds) and Hospitals with 16 LTI/Ds. All recorded respective variances of +52.9, -42.4, 0.0 (no change), and -23.8 per cent compared to 2011-12.
  • During the five years from 2011-12 to 2015-16p, no work-related traumatic injury fatalities were recorded for the mechanism of incident group Chemical and Other Substances.
  • Diseases related to hazardous substances may have a long latency period and may not become evident until after a worker leaves the workforce.
  • Preventive health surveillance and air monitoring work reduces the likelihood of workers developing diseases. 

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