Flash new approach to young consumers


About the project

The Department of Consumer and Employment Protection approached Curtin University’s Multimedia Design course to develop the project using Macromedia Flash software.

The students created interactive scenarios and role-play on consumer protection issues including shopping rights, tenancy, buying a car and managing credit cards. The project is aimed at youth aged 18 to 24.

The use of Flash allows young people to interact with the software, coming up with different responses and scenarios. Flash is also relatively affordable and easy-to-use.

The winning entries...


Desmond Lau
Flash movie
Elise Martinson
Flash movie
Joey Hamidon
Flash movie
Kristy Davis
Flash movie
Ronald Lau
Flash movie

Desmond Lau
The clumsy pirate

The clumsiest pirate in the galaxy just bought a second hand spaceship to rip off the galaxy. A twist on buying cars for the first time in the second-hand car market.

Elise Martinson
Warranties – The Musical

A story about Billy the farmer, his bulls, the seller and the warranty that saved his farm. An interactive musical on the different type of warranties you can encounter when you are asserting your shopping rights.

Joey Hamidon
Skateboarder’s guide to a property condition report

To illustrative guide on what to do when you move into your first rental home. A digital camera and a keen eye make the property condition report a lot easier than you think.

Kristy Davis
Property inspection

Two roommates just moved out of home and into their dream house – which turned out to be more than they bargained for. They need your help with their property inspection to protect their consumer rights.

Ronald Lam
Your Shopping rights and getting your money back

A detective game in which you help Martin find out when you can get your money back in purchases where half the sellers are dead people.

Consumer Protection Commissioner Patrick Walker said Consumer Protection developed the project because young people generally do not like to read government publications. Instead, they get their information from the Internet, television, radio, magazines and film. Young people are one of the most vulnerable sections of the community and are often not aware of their rights and responsibilities as consumers. “We are always looking for ways to tap into the “Internet generation”, and who better to help us do this than young people themselves,” Mr Walker said.

“The popularity of computer games shows that computers, together with interactive narrative, can have a powerful effect on young people. “Technology and the way information is provided is changing rapidly and as a government department, we need to respond to this.’”

Mr Walker said the project gives the Curtin multimedia students real work experience as information designers, working with a client who wants them to be creative.

The Multimedia Design course at Curtin has a strong emphasis on creativity and design in the use of new technologies. Through project-based works linked to academic studies, students explore ways to take their conceptual design ideas into practice. Engaging with community projects such as this is an integral part of this process.

Congratulations to the five winners of the Multimedia project and you can view the entries using the links above.

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