Button batteries. Tiny batteries. Big danger!

This publication is for: 
Consumer

Button batteries are a hidden hazard in your home in a number of everyday household items. Every week in Australia 20 children are taken to hospital after swallowing or inserting button batteries. If swallowed, they can become stuck in a child’s throat and result in catastrophic injuries and even death.
Knowing the big danger a little battery poses means you can take steps to keep children safe.

Button battery flyer header
Button battery flyer header , by Consumer Protection
If you suspect your child has swallowed or inserted a button battery, call the Poisons Information Centre immediately on 13 11 26.
If your child is having difficulty breathing, contact 000. Once at the hospital, ask for an X-ray.

Items that can contain button batteries include:

  • TV remote
  • hearing aid
  • bathroom scales
  • AirTags (Apple)
  • flameless candles
  • toys

If you suspect your child has swallowed or inserted a button battery, call the Poisons Information Centre immediately on 13 11 26. If your child is having difficulty breathing, contact 000. Once at the hospital, ask for an X-ray.

There are a number of ways you can protect children:

  • Check – look for products that do not use button batteries or check for child resistant battery compartments.
  • Secure – ensure compartments that house batteries are secured with a screw or require dual simultaneous movements to open. 
  • Inspect – regularly check toys and items for wear and tear in case access to the button battery compartment has loosened.
  • Store – keep new and used batteries out of sight and reach of children at all times.
  • Safely dispose – put sticky tape around the battery and immediately recycle safely or put it in an outside bin. Even old or spent button batteries can be dangerous for kids.
  • Tell everyone – talk to anyone else who cares for children, to make sure they’re aware of the risks that button batteries pose. 
  • Learn – visit Product Safety Australia’s website for more information: www.productsafety.gov.au

 

Consumer Protection
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Last updated 13 Jan 2022

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